Ten events that led to the revolutionary war

Timeline created by Tamia Robinson134
  • Currency Act

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currency_Act
    The Currency Act is one of many several Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain that regulated paper money issued by the colonies of British America. The Acts sought to protect British merchants and creditors from being paid in depreciated colonial currency.[citation needed] The policy created tension between the colonies and Great Britain, and was cited as a grievance by colonists early in the American Revolution.
  • sugar Act

    http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/related/sugaract.html
    On April 5, 1764, Parliament passed a modified version of the Sugar and Molasses Act (1733), which was about to expire. Under the Molasses Act colonial merchants had been required to pay a tax of six pence per gallon on the importation of foreign molasses. But because of corruption, they mostly evaded the taxes and undercut the intention of the tax — that the English product would be cheaper than that from the French West Indies.
  • Stamp Act

    http://www.history.org/history/teaching/tchcrsta.cfmThe Stamp Act was passed by the British Parliament on March 22, 1765. The new tax was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper they used. Ship's papers, legal documents, licenses, newspapers, other publications, and even playing cards were taxed. The money collected by the Stamp Act was to be used to help pay the costs of defending and protecting.
  • quartering act

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartering_Acts
    Quartering Act is a name given to a minimum of two Acts of British Parliament in the local governments of the American colonies to provide the British soldiers with any needed accommodations and housing. It also required colonists to provide food for any British soldiers in the area. Each of the Quartering Acts was an amendment to the Mutiny Act and required annual renewal by Parliament.[1]
  • Town shed act

    http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/Townsend-acts
    viewing taxation as an abuse of Great Britain’s constitutional relationship with the colonies. : ‘In all free states, the constitution is fixed; it is from therefore it cannot change the constitution without destroying its own foundation.’ Governor Francis Bernard of Massachusetts dissolved the legislature when it issued a Circular Letter describing the measures it had taken against the Townsend Acts.
  • Boston massacre

    http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/boston-massacre
    he Boston Massacre occurred on March 5, 1770. A squad of British soldiers, come to support a sentry who was being pressed by a heckling, snowballing crowd, let loose a volley of shots. Three persons were killed immediately and two died later of their wounds; among the victims was Crispus Attucks, a man of black or Indian parentage. The British officer in charge, Capt. Thomas Preston, was arrested for manslaughter, along with eight
  • Tea Act

    https://www.bostonteapartyship.com/the-tea-act
    The Tea Act, passed by Parliament on May 10, 1773, granted the British East India Company Tea a monopoly on tea sales in the American colonies. This was what ultimately compelled a group of Sons of Liberty members on the night of December 16, 1773 to disguise themselves as Mohawk Indians, board three ships moored in Boston Harbor, and destroy over 92,000 pounds of tea.
  • intolierble act

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intolerable_Acts
    The Intolerable Acts were the American Patriots' term for a series of punitive laws passed by the British Parliament in 1774 after the Boston Tea Party. They were meant to punish the Massachusetts colonists for their defiance of throwing a large tea shipment into Boston Harbor in reaction to changes in taxation by the British to the detriment of Colonial goods. In Great Britain, these laws were referred to as the Coercive Acts.
  • First Continental congress

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Continental_Congress
    The First Continental Congress was a meeting of delegates from twelve of the Thirteen Colonies who met from September 5 to October 26, 1774 at Carpenters' Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania early in the American Revolution. It was called in response to the Intolerable Acts passed by the British Parliament, which the British referred to as the Coercive Acts, with which the British intended to punish Massachusetts for the Boston Tea Party.