National Park timeline thinamajigamabobamableeberamaschtuffama3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971 is the first 41 digits of pi and i am a beautiful person.

Timeline created by B-23515
In History
  • 13

    stage 3

    stage 3
  • 500

    stage 4

    stage 4
  • '49ers

    '49ers
    The first explorers to enter Death Valley were two groups of "49ers" heading for the California gold fields.
  • movies

    movies
    The following list of movie or television film/video productions were shot on location in or near Death Valley.
    20 Mule Team (1940)
    3 Godfathers (1948)
    Accomplice (1946)
    Air Mail(1925)
    Ambush @ Stovepipe Wells (1958)
    American Vacation (1984)
    Bleak Future (1997)
    Branded (1965)
    Bride Came C.O.D. (1941)
    Brute, The (1927)
    Cattle Drive (1951)
    Castle in the Desert (1942)
    Cherry 2k (1987)
    Chimmie Fadden Out West (1915)
    Chinese Parrot (1927)
    City of Bad Men (1953)
    and many more!
  • golf

    golf
    Furnace Creek Golf Course- also known as The Lowest Golf Course On Earth, and 18 in Hell- is an 18-hole golf course located at 214 feet below sea level.
  • National Park Dedication

    National Park Dedication
    On 1994, President Clinton dedicated approximately 1.3 mill acres of land to Death Valley AND declared it a National Park-making it the largest park OUTSIDE of Alaska!
  • mass modern tourism

    mass modern tourism
  • mystery of sliding stones solved!!! yay

    mystery of sliding stones solved!!! yay
    In the year 2013, in October, scientists made a huge discovery! They figured out the secret of the movement of the sailing stones! NPS.org had a section about this topic (here it is)-
    "On 12/21/2013, it happened just before noon, popping and cracking sounds all over the surface. I said to Jim, 'This is it!'"
    Individual rocks remained in motion for anywhere from a few seconds to 16 minutes.
    (to see more info on this page visit https://www.nps.gov/deva/learn/news/racetrack.htm)
  • Period:
    7,987 BCE
    to
    6,987 BCE

    10,000-9000 years ago

    "The archeological record indicates that American Indians have lived in Death Valley for the last 10,000 years, a period known as the Holocene. Four distinct American Indian cultural stages emerged during this time frame. The populations, however, have always been small and have fluctuated with changes in the climate."
    info obtained from Oh Ranger
  • Period:
    6,987 BCE
    to
    5,000 BCE

    First Stage

    The first stage—which archeologists estimate occurred approximately 9,000 years ago—coincides with a time of plentiful precipitation, a lake in the basin and a cool climate. Back then, the Nevares Spring people hunted game and used scrapers and knives made of chert, a unique rock type that flakes easily and could readily be fashioned into projectile points.
    (all info obtained from http://www.ohranger.com/death-valley/history)
  • Period:
    5,000 BCE
    to
    2,987 BCE

    stage 2

    The next stage was a hot and dry period that lasted roughly 4,000 years; sometime during that era the Mesquite Flat people, who shared a similar culture, replaced the original inhabitants. The presence of a few grinding tools in the Mesquite Flat toolbox, however, suggests that human subsistence was shifting from hunting animals to the gathering of seeds, nuts and berries.
  • Period:
    13
    to
    500

    stage 3

    In the third stage, commencing about 2,000 years ago, the Saratoga Spring people evolved in what had become a dry, hot desert. These were more advanced hunters and gatherers, who brought the bow and arrow and left mysterious, meticulously crafted stone patterns in the valley.
  • Period:
    500
    to

    stage 4

    The people of the fourth stage, which began around A.D. 500, were directly related to some of the Shoshone-speaking tribes who still inhabit the valley. These people introduced pottery to the region and were nomads living on game, mesquite beans and pinyon nuts.
  • Period: to

    tourism-national monument

    The first tourist facilities in Death Valley were tent houses built in the 1920s at Stovepipe Wells. In 1927, a borax company turned
    Furnace Creek Ranch into a resort and built the Furnace Creek Inn. The valley quickly became popular in the winter. In 1933, 3000 square miles was established by President Hoover as a national monument under the administration of the National Park Service.
  • Period: to

    mass modern tourism

    As a result of the Desert Protection Act, signed into law in 1994 by President Clinton, about 1.3 million acres were added to Death Valley and the monument became an official national park—the largest outside of Alaska. Today, the park welcomes more than 1 million visitors annually.