Chapters 8-14 (1880-1934)

Timeline created by karina ayala
In History
  • bicycle touring clud founded in europe

    bicycle touring clud founded in europe
    with their huge tires and solid rubber tires the first american bicycles challened their riders
  • U.S. population exceeds 50 million

    U.S. population exceeds 50 million
    The United States has dozens of major cities, including 8 of the 60 "global cities" of all types, with three in the "alpha" group of global cities: New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago.
  • James Garfield inaugurated as President

     James Garfield inaugurated as President
    the 20th President of the United States, after completing nine consecutive terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. Garfield's accomplishments as President included a controversial resurgence of Presidential authority above Senatorial courtesy in executive appointments; energizing U.S. naval power; and purging corruption in the Postal Service. Garfield made notable ambassador and judiciary appointments, including a U.S. Supreme Court justice. Garfield appointed several African Americans to pr
  • constuctionof the brooklyn bridge is completed

    constuctionof the brooklyn bridge is completed
    The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. With a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), it was the longest suspension bridge in the world from its opening until 1903, and the first steel-wire suspension bridge
  • Brooklyn Bridge opens

    Brooklyn Bridge opens
    oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. With a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), it was the longest suspension bridge in the world from its opening until 1903, and the first steel-wire suspension bridge
  • Haymarket affair

    Haymarket affair
    also known as the Haymarket massacre or Haymarket riot) was a demonstration and unrest that took place on Tuesday May 4, 1886, at the Haymarket Square. in Chicago. It began as a rally in support of striking workers. An unknown person threw a dynamite bomb at police as they dispersed the public meeting. The bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of eight police officers.
  • Dawes Act

    Dawes Act
    adopted by Congress in 1887, authorized the President of the United States to survey Indian tribal land and divide the land into allotments for individual Indians. The Act was named for its sponsor, Senator Henry L. Dawes of Massachusetts. The Dawes Act was amended in 1891 and again in 1906 by the Burke Act. The stated objective of the Dawes Act was to stimulate assimilation of Indians into American society. Individual ownership of land was seen as an essential step. The act also provided that t
  • Richmond, Virginia, became the first American city to electrify its urban transit.

    Richmond, Virginia, became the first American city to electrify its urban transit.
    intricate networks of electric street cars or trolly cars ran from outlying neighborhoods to downtown offices and department stores.
  • Eastman introduced his Kodak camera

    Eastman introduced his Kodak camera
    price was 25$ with a 100-picture roll of film for 10$ the pictures were developed and returned with camera reloaded.
  • Benjamin Harrison becomes President

    Benjamin Harrison becomes President
    23rd President of the United States (1889–1893). Harrison, a grandson of President William Henry Harrison, was born in North Bend, Ohio, and moved to Indianapolis, Indiana at age 21, eventually becoming a prominent politician there. During the American Civil War, he served as a Brigadier General in the XX Corps of the Army of the Cumberland. After the war he unsuccessfully ran for the governorship of Indiana, and was later appointed to the U.S. Senate from that state.
  • barnum and bailey circus opens in london

    barnum and bailey circus opens in london
    Astley owned a riding-school in London, England, where Astley and his students gave exhibitions of riding tricks. At Astley's school the circular area where the riders performed became known as the circus ring.
  • Louis Sullivan designed the ten story Wainwright Building in St.Louis

    Louis Sullivan designed the ten story Wainwright Building in St.Louis
    called the new breed of sky scraper a "proud and soaring thing".
  • ida b wells crusades against lynching

    ida b wells crusades against lynching
    Ida B. Wells has been described as a crusader for justice, and as a defender of democracy. Wells was characterized as a militant and uncompromising leader for her efforts to abolish lynching and establish racial equality. Wells challenged segregation decades before Rosa Parks, ran for Congress and attended suffrage meetings with the likes of Susan B. Anthony and Jane Addams, yet most of her efforts are largely unknown due to the fact that she is African American and female.
  • General Electric Company founded

    General Electric Company founded
    or GE, is an American multinational conglomerate corporation incorporated in Schenectady, New York and headquartered in Fairfield, Connecticut, United States.The company operates through five segments: Energy, Technology Infrastructure, NBC Universal, Capital Finance and Consumer & Industrial
  • buisness groups, aided by us marines, overthrow hawaiis queen liliuokalani.

    buisness groups, aided by us marines, overthrow hawaiis queen liliuokalani.
    On January 17, 1893, the conspirators announced the overthrow of the queen's government. To avoid bloodshed, Queen Lydia Kamakaeha Liliuokalani yielded her sovereignty and called upon the U.S. government "to undo the actions of its representatives." The U.S. government refused to help her regain her throne
  • guglielmo marconi develops the technology that led to modern radio

    guglielmo marconi develops the technology that led to modern radio
    Transmission and radiation of radio frequency energy was a feature exhibited in the experiments by Nikola Tesla which he proposed might be used for the telecommunication of information. The Tesla method was described in New York in 189] In 1897, Tesla applied for two key United States radio patents, US 645576 , first radio system patent, and US 649621 . Tesla also used sensitive electromagnetic receivers, that were unlike the less responsive coherers later used by Ma
  • plessy vs ferguson

    plessy vs ferguson
    The "separate but equal" provision of private services mandated by state government is constitutional under the Equal Protection Clause.
  • marie curie discovers radium

    marie curie discovers radium
    Marie and Pierre Curie's pioneering research was again brought to mind when on April 20 1995, their bodies were taken from their place of burial at Sceaux, just outside Paris, and in a solemn ceremony were laid to rest under the mighty dome of the Panthéon. Marie Curie thus became the first woman to be accorded this mark of honour on her own merit. One woman, Sophie Berthelot, admittedly already rested there but in the capacity of wife of the chemist Marcelin Berthelot (1827-1907).
  • u.s.s. maine explodes and sinks. the spanish american war begins

    u.s.s. maine explodes and sinks. the spanish american war begins
    This approach led to the death of over 100,000 Cubans and Weyler was promptly nicknamed "the Butcher" by the American press. Stories of atrocities in Cuban were played up by the "yellow press," and the public put increasing pressure on Presidents Grover Cleveland and William McKinley to intervene. Working through diplomatic channels, McKinley was able to defuse the situation and Weyler was recalled to Spain in late 1897. The following January, supporters of Weyler began a series of riots in Hava
  • the interpetation of dreams

    the interpetation of dreams
    In the following pages, I shall demonstrate that there is a psychological technique which makes it possible to interpret dreams, and that on the application of this technique, every dream will reveal itself as a psychological structure, full of significance, and one which may be assigned to a specific place in the psychic activities of the waking state. Further, I shall endeavour to elucidate the processes which underlie the strangeness and obscurity of dreams, and to deduce from these processes
  • Open Door Policy (no picture available)

    concept in foreign affairs, which usually refers to the policy around 1900 allowing multiple Imperial powers access to China, with none of them in control of that country. As a theory, the Open Door Policy originates with British commercial practice, as was reflected in treaties concluded with Qing Dynasty China after the First Opium War (1839-1842). Although the Open Door is generally associated with China, it was recognized at the Berlin Conference of 1885, which declared that no power could
  • in china the boxers rebel

    in china the boxers rebel
    The Boxer Rebellion, also called The Boxer Uprising by some historians or the Righteous Harmony Society Movement in northern China, was a proto-nationalist movement by the "Righteous Harmony Society
  • U.S. helps put down Boxer Rebellion

    U.S. helps put down Boxer Rebellion
    Beijing, Boxer fighters threatened foreigners and forced them to seek refuge in the Legation Quarter. In response, the initially hesitant Empress Dowager Cixi, urged by the conservatives of the Imperial Court, supported the Boxers and declared war on foreign powers. Diplomats, foreign civilians and soldiers, and Chinese Christians in the Legation Quarter were under siege by the Imperial Army of China and the Boxers for 55 days. The Chinese government equivocated between destroying the foreigners
  • William McKinley assassinated

    William McKinley assassinated
    the 25th President of the United States. The President and Mrs. McKinley attended the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. He delivered a speech about his positions on tariffs and foreign trade on September 5, 1901. The following morning, McKinley visited Niagara Falls before returning to the Exposition. That afternoon McKinley had an engagement to greet the public at the Temple of Music. Standing in line, Leon Frank Czolgosz waited with a pistol in his right hand concealed by a handker
  • First Rose Bowl game played

    First Rose Bowl game played
    Originally titled the "Tournament East-West football game," the first Rose Bowl was played on January 1, 1902, starting the tradition of New Year's Day bowl games. The inaugural game featured Fielding H. Yost's dominating 1901 Michigan team, representing the East, which crushed a previously 3-1-2 team from Stanford University, representing the West, by a score of 49–0 after Stanford quit in the third quarter. Michigan finished the season 11–0 and was crowned the national champion. Yost had been
  • panama declares its independence from colombia

    panama declares its independence from colombia
    With the support of the U.S. government, Panama issues a declaration of independence from Colombia. The revolution was engineered by a Panamanian faction backed by the Panama Canal Company, a French-U.S. corporation that hoped to connect the Atlantic and Pacific oceans with a waterway across the Isthmus of Panama.
  • First World Series

     First World Series
    annual championship series of Major League Baseball, the conclusion of the postseason. Since the Series takes place in October, sportswriters many years ago dubbed the event the Fall Classic; it is also sometimes known as the October Classic or simply The Series. It is played between the League Championship Series winning clubs from MLB's two circuits, the American and National Leagues. The World Series has been played every year since 1903 with the exception of 1904 (boycott) and 1994 (player
  • Orville and Wilbur Wright bicycle manufactures from Dayton, Ohio had their first successful flight.

    Orville and Wilbur Wright bicycle manufactures from Dayton, Ohio had their first successful flight.
    covered 120 feet and lasted 12 seconds.
  • theodore roosevelt is elected president

    theodore roosevelt is elected president
    26th President of the United States (1901–1909). He is noted for his energetic personality, range of interests and achievements, leadership of the Progressive Movement, and his "cowboy" image and robust masculinity.He was a leader of the Republican Party and founder of the short-lived Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party of 1912. Before becoming President, he held offices at the municipal, state, and federal level of government. Roosevelt's achievements as a naturalist, explorer, hunter, author,
  • Niagara Falls conference

    Niagara Falls conference
    The Niagara Falls conference was a meeting of twenty-nine men on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls from July 11 until 14 July 1905. It was the first meeting of The Niagara Movement, a group of African-Americans, led by W. E. B. Du Bois, John Hope, and William Monroe Trotter
  • Susan B. Anthony dies

     Susan B. Anthony dies
    prominent American civil rights leader who played a pivotal role in the 19th century women's rights movement to introduce women's suffrage into the United States. She was co-founder of the first Women's Temperance Movement with Elizabeth Cady Stanton as President. also co-founded the women's rights journal, The Revolution. She traveled the United States and Europe, and averaged 75 to 100 speeches per year.[2] She was one of the important advocates in leading the way for women's rights to be ack
  • San Francisco earthquake

    San Francisco earthquake
    a major earthquake that struck San Francisco, California, and the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 1906. The most widely accepted estimate for the magnitude of the earthquake is a moment magnitude (Mw) of 7.9;
  • Oklahoma becomes a state

    Oklahoma becomes a state
    a state located in the South Central region of the United States of America. With an estimated 3,751,351 residents as of the 2010 census and a land area of 68,667 square miles (177,847 km²),[3] Oklahoma is the 28th most populous and 20th-largest state. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people",
  • henry ford introduces the model t

    henry ford introduces the model t
    Henry Ford watched the fifteen millionth Model T Ford roll off the assembly line at his factory in Highland Park, Michigan. Since his "universal car" was the industrial success story of its age, the ceremony should have been a happy occasion. Yet Ford was probably wistful that day, too, knowing as he did that the long production life of the Model T was about to come to an end. He climbed into the car, a shiny black coupe, with his son, Edsel, the president of the Ford Motor Company. Together, th
  • Aldrich–Vreeland Act

    Aldrich–Vreeland Act
    bill passed the House on a mostly party-line vote of 166–140, with 13 Republicans voting against it and no Democrats voting for it. On May 30, it passed in the Senate with 43 Republicans in favor and five Republicans joining 17 Democrats opposed. President Roosevelt signed the bill that same night.
  • - Federal Bureau of Investigation established

     - Federal Bureau of Investigation established
    (FBI) is an agency of the United States Department of Justice that serves as both a federal criminal investigative body and an internal intelligence agency (counterintelligence). The FBI has investigative jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crime. Its motto is a backronym of FBI, "Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity".
  • william howard taft is elected president

    william howard taft is elected president
    William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and later the tenth Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930). He is the only person to have served in both offices.
  • Robert Peary claims to have reached the North Pole

     Robert Peary claims to have reached the North Pole
    The North Pole, also known as the Geographic North Pole or Terrestrial North Pole, is, subject to the caveats explained below, defined as the point in the northern hemisphere where the Earth's axis of rotation meets its surface. It should not be confused with the North Magnetic Pole. Robert Edwin Peary, Sr. (May 6, 1856 – February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who claimed to have been the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the geographic North Pole. Peary's claim was widely credited
  • Taft implements Dollar Diplomacy

    Taft implements Dollar Diplomacy
    Dollar Diplomacy is the term used to describe the effort of the United States — particularly under President William Howard Taft — to further its aims in Latin America and East Asia through use of its economic power by guaranteeing loans made to foreign countries
  • Boy Scouts of America chartered

    Boy Scouts of America chartered
    The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is one of the largest youth organizations in the United States, with over 4.5 million youth members in its age-related divisions. Since its founding in 1910 as part of the international Scout Movement, more than 110 million Americans have been members of the BSA
  • mexican revolution begins

    mexican revolution begins
    major armed struggle that started in 1910, with an uprising led by Francisco I. Madero against longtime autocrat Porfirio Díaz. The Revolution was characterized by several socialist, liberal, anarchist, populist, and agrarianist movements. Over time the Revolution changed from a revolt against the established order to a multi-sided civil war.
  • the mexican revoulution begins

    the mexican revoulution begins
    In 1910, the Mexican Revolution began. It was the 20th Century’s first modern social revolution, destined to change Mexico’s society and economy. It would result in a flood of Mexican immigrants into the United States. The choices were simple for Mexicans who opposed the fighting: hide away or leave the country. Many of the Mexican citizens chose to head north, immigrating to the United States. The turmoil of the war, the danger, the economic catastrophe and social chaos surrounding the revoluti
  • First ever Indianapolis 500 is staged; Ray Harroun is the first winner

     First ever Indianapolis 500 is staged; Ray Harroun is the first winner
    The Indianapolis 500-Mile Race, also known as the Indianapolis 500, the 500 Miles at Indianapolis, the Indy 500 or The 500, is an American automobile race, held annually, typically on the last weekend in May (specifically over the Memorial Day weekend) at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. The event lends its name to the IndyCar class, or formula, of open-wheel race cars that have competed in it.
  • Girl Scouts of the USA was started by Juliette Gordon Low

    Girl Scouts of the USA was started by Juliette Gordon Low
    The Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA) is a youth organization for girls in the United States and American girls living abroad. It describes itself as "the world's preeminent organization dedicated solely to girls". It was founded by Juliette Gordon Low in 1912 and was organized after Low met Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting, in 1911 Upon returning to Savannah, Georgia, she made her historic telephone call to a distant cousin, saying, "I've got something for the girl
  • RMS Titanic sinks

     RMS Titanic sinks
    RMS Titanic was a passenger liner that struck an iceberg on her maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York City, and sank on 15 April 1912, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 people in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.
  • chinas qin dynasty topples

    chinas qin dynasty topples
    The Qin Dynasty was the dynasty that redefined China. The emperor of this era wanted to conquer the warring states that the Chou dynasty had in essence created. This emperor succeeded and China was one nation once more.
  • 16th Amendment, establishing an income tax

    16th Amendment, establishing an income tax
    The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on Census results. This amendment exempted income taxes from the constitutional requirements regarding direct taxes, after income taxes on rents, dividends, and interest were ruled to be direct taxes in Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co. (1895). It was ratified on February 3, 1913.
  • woodrow wilson is elected president

    woodrow wilson is elected president
    Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, from 1913 to 1921. A leader of the Progressive Movement, he served as President of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910, and then as the Governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913. With Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party candidate Theodore Roosevelt and Republican nominee William Howard Taft dividing the Republican Party vote, Wilson was elected President as a Democrat in 1912. Like his arch-r
  • 17th Amendment, establishing direct election of U.S. Senators.

    17th Amendment, establishing direct election of U.S. Senators.
    The Seventeenth Amendment (Amendment XVII) to the United States Constitution established direct election of United States Senators by popular vote. The amendment supersedes. Clauses 1 and 2 of the Constitution, under which Senators were elected by state legislatures. It also alters the procedure for filling vacancies in the Senate, to be consistent with the method of election. It was adopted on April 8, 1913.
  • world war one begins in europe

    world war one begins in europe
    known as the Great War, conflict, chiefly in Europe, among most of the great Western powers. It was the largest war the world had yet seen
  • the panama canal opens

    the panama canal opens
    The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that joins the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. Built from 1904 to 1914, annual traffic has risen from about 1,000 ships in the canal's early days to 14,702 vessels in 2008, measuring a total 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons. In total over 815,000 vessels have passed through the canal. It has been named one o
  • hollywood, california, becomes tthe center of the movie production in the us.

    hollywood, california, becomes tthe center of the movie production in the us.
    Hollywood is a district in Los Angeles, California, United States situated west-northwest of downtown Los Angeles. Due to its fame and cultural identity as the historical center of movie studios and movie stars, the word Hollywood is often used as a metonym of American cinema. Today, much of the movie industry has dispersed into surrounding areas such as the Westside neighborhood, but significant auxiliary industries, such as editing, effects, props, post-production, and lighting companies
  • archduke franz ferdinard and his wife are assasinated

    archduke franz ferdinard and his wife are assasinated
    , Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir apparent to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot dead in Sarajevo, by Gavrilo Princip, one of a group of six Bosnian Serb assassins coordinated by Danilo Ilić. The political objective of the assassination was to break off Austria-Hungary's south-Slav provinces so they could be combined into a Greater Serbia or a Yugoslavia. The assassins' motives were consistent with the movement that later became known as
  • Mother's Day established as a national holiday

    Mother's Day established as a national holiday
    Mother's Day is a celebration honoring mothers and celebrating motherhood, maternal bonds, and the influence of mothers in society. It is celebrated on various days in many parts of the world, yet most commonly in March, April, or May. It complements Father's Day, the celebration honoring fathers.
    Celebrations of mothers and motherhood occur throughout the world; many of these can be traced back to ancient festivals, like the Greek cult to Cybele or the Roman festival of Hilaria. The modern US
  • world war one begins

    world war one begins
    Before World War II, the war was also known as The Great War, The World War, or The War in Europe. In France and Belgium, it was sometimes referred to as La Guerre du Droit (the War for Justice) or La Guerre Pour la Civilisation / de Oorlog tot de Beschaving (the War to Preserve Civilisation), especially on medals and commemorative monuments. The term used by official histories of the war in Britain and Canada is First World War, while American histories generally use the term World War I.
  • the birth of a nation opens

    the birth of a nation opens
    The Birth of a Nation (originally called The Clansman) is a 1915 American silent film co-written (with Frank E. Woods), co-produced (with Harry Aitken), and directed by D. W. Griffith and based on the novel and play The Clansman, both by Thomas Dixon, Jr.
  • RMS Lusitania sinks

    RMS Lusitania sinks
    The vessel went down eleven miles (19 km) off the Old Head of KinsaleIreland, killing 1,198 of the 1,959 people aboard, leaving 761 survivors. The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany, contributed to the American entry into World War I and became an iconic symbol in military recruiting campaigns of why the war was being fought.
  • Jeannette Rankin first woman elected to U.S. congress

    Jeannette Rankin first woman elected to U.S. congress
    was the first woman in the US Congress. A Republican, she was elected statewide in Montana in 1916 and again in 1940. A lifelong pacifist, she voted against the entry of the United States into both World War I and World War II, the only member of Congress to vote against the latter. She is the only woman to be elected to Congress from Montana.
  • Federal Farm Loan Act

    Federal Farm Loan Act
    The Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916 was a United States federal law aimed at increasing credit to rural, family farmers. It did so by creating a federal farm loan board, twelve regional farm loan banks and tens of farm loan associations. The act was signed into law by President of the United States Woodrow Wilson
  • mexico revises and adopts its constitution

    mexico revises and adopts its constitution
    The Political Constitution of the United Mexican States of 1917 is the present constitution of Mexico. It was drafted in the city of Santiago de Queretaro by a Constitutional Convention during the Mexican Revolution. It was approved by the Constitutional Congress on February 5, 1917, with Venustiano Carranza serving as the first president under its terms
  • the united states enters world war one

    the united states enters world war one
    When war erupted in 1914, the United States attempted to remain neutral and was a proponent for the rights of neutral states. Isolationist foreign policy was encouraged by Congress's apprehensions about giving other countries a political door into US policies and the cultural melting pot of the United States' population. In spite of these factors, the United States did enter World War I, as a result of several events.
  • puerto ricans become us citizens

    puerto ricans become us citizens
    Barely a month before the United States enters World War I, President Woodrow Wilson signs the Jones-Shafroth act, granting U.S. citizenship to the inhabitants of Puerto Rico. Wilson signed the Jones-Shafroth Act, under which Puerto Rico became a U.S. territory and Puerto Ricans were granted statutory citizenship, meaning that citizenship was granted by an act of Congress and not by the Constitution (thus it was not guaranteed by the Constitution). The act also created a bill of rights for the
  • President Wilson's Fourteen Points, which assures citizens that the Great War was being fought for a moral cause and for postwar peace in Europe

    President Wilson's Fourteen Points, which assures citizens that the Great War was being fought for a moral cause and for postwar peace in Europe
    The Fourteen Points was a speech delivered by United States President Woodrow Wilson to a joint session of Congress on January 8, 1918. The address was intended to assure the country that the Great War was being fought for a moral cause and for postwar peace in Europe. People in Europe generally welcomed Wilson's intervention, but his Allied colleagues (Georges Clemenceau, David Lloyd George and Vittorio Emanuele Orlando) were skeptical of the applicability of Wilsonian idealism.
  • - 18th Amendment, establishing Prohibition

    - 18th Amendment, establishing Prohibition
    The Eighteenth Amendment (Amendment XVIII) of the United States Constitution, along with the Volstead Act, which defined "intoxicating liquors" to exclude those used for religious purposes, established Prohibition in the United States. The Amendment was unique in setting a time delay before it would take effect following ratification, and in setting a time limit for its ratification by the states. Its ratification was certified on January 16, 1919.
  • mohandas gandhi becomes leader of the independece movement in india

    mohandas gandhi becomes leader of the independece movement in india
    His philosophy was firmly founded upon ahimsa (nonviolence). His philosophy and leadership helped India gain independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. Gandhi is often referred to as Mahatma
  • eighteenth amendment outlaws alcoholic beverages

    eighteenth amendment outlaws alcoholic beverages
    Prohibition in the United States (sometimes referred to as the Noble Experiment) was a national ban on the sale, manufacture, and transportation of alcohol, in place from 1920 to 1933.The ban was mandated by the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution. It was repealed on December 5, 1933.
  • 19th amendment grants women the right to vote

    19th amendment grants women the right to vote
    the 19th Amendment was ratified after decades of struggle by women’s rights advocates, bringing a successful end to the U.S. women’s suffrage movement. first introduced to Congress in 1878. Forty-one years later, it was passed by both houses of Congress on June 4, 1919, and sent to the states for ratification.
  • Sacco and Vanzetti arrested

    Sacco and Vanzetti arrested
    Ferdinando Nicola Sacco (April 22, 1891–August 23, 1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (June 11, 1888–August 23, 1927) were anarchists who were convicted of murdering two men during a 1920 armed robbery in South Braintree, Massachusetts. After a controversial trial and a series of appeals, the two Italian immigrants were executed on August 23, 1927.There is a highly politicized dispute over their guilt or innocence, as well as whether or not the trials were fair.] The dispute focuses on small de
  • Warren G. Harding becomes President

    Warren G. Harding becomes President
    29th President of the United States (1921–23). A Republican from Ohio, Harding was an influential self-made newspaper publisher. He served in the Ohio Senate (1899–1903), as the 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ohio (1903–05) and as a U.S. Senator (1915–21). He was also the first incumbent United States Senator and the first newspaper publisher to be elected President
  • Warren G. Harding becomes President

    Warren G. Harding becomes President
    Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States (1921–23). A Republican from Ohio, Harding was an influential self-made newspaper publisher. He served in the Ohio Senate (1899–1903), as the 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ohio (1903–05) and as a U.S. Senator (1915–21). He was also the first incumbent United States Senator and the first newspaper publisher to be elected President.
  • Emergency Quota Act (no picture available)

    The Emergency Quota Act, also known as the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921, the Immigration Restriction Act of 1921, the Per Centum Law, and the Johnson Quota Act (ch. 8, 42 Stat. 5 of May 19, 1921) restricted immigration into the United States. Although intended as temporary legislation, the Act "proved in the long run the most important turning-point in American immigration policy
  • Scopes trial, whose outcome found that the teaching of evolution in the classroom "does not violate church and state or state religion laws but instead, merely prohibits the teaching of evolution on the grounds of

     Scopes trial, whose outcome found that the teaching of evolution in the classroom "does not violate church and state or state religion laws but instead, merely prohibits the teaching of evolution on the grounds of
    was a landmark American legal case. which high school biology teacher, John Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act which made it unlawful to teach evolution. Scopes was found guilty, but the verdict was overturned on a technicality and he was never brought back to trial. The trial drew intense national publicity, as national reporters flocked to the small town of Dayton, to cover the big-name lawyers representing each side. William Jennings Bryan, three time presidential candi
  • U.S. citizenship granted to inhabitants of U.S. Virgin Islands

     U.S. citizenship granted to inhabitants of U.S. Virgin Islands
    The Virgin Islands of the United States (commonly called the United States Virgin Islands or U.S. Virgin Islands) are a group of islands in the Caribbean that are an insular area of the United States. The islands are geographically part of the Virgin Islands archipelago and are located in the Leeward Islands of the Lesser Antilles.
  • Amelia Earhart becomes the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean

    Amelia Earhart becomes the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean
    During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10 Electra, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Fascination with her life, career and disappearance continues to this day.
  • Kellogg-Briand Pact

     Kellogg-Briand Pact
    The Kellogg–Briand Pact (also called the General Treaty for the Renunciation of War or the World Peace Act) was signed on August 27, 1928 by the United States, France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan, Weimar Germany and a number of other countries.The pact renounced aggressive war, prohibiting the use of war as "an instrument of national policy" except in matters of self-defense.
  • Disney's Steamboat Willie opens, the first animated picture to feature Mickey Mouse

     Disney's Steamboat Willie opens, the first animated picture to feature Mickey Mouse
    It was the third Mickey Mouse cartoon to be produced and the first to be released. Disney used Pat Powers's Cinephone system, created by Powers using Lee De Forest's Phonofilm system without giving De Forest any credit. Steamboat Willie premiered at B. S. Moss's Colony Theater in New York, The cartoon was directed, produced and voiced by Walt Disney
  • Saint Valentine's Day massacre

    Saint Valentine's Day massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day massacre is the name given to the murder of seven people as part of a prohibition era conflict between two powerful criminal gangs in Chicago, in 1929: the South Side Italian gang led by Al Capone and the North Side Irish gang led by Bugs Moran. Former members of the Egan's Rats gang were also suspected to have played a large role in the St. Valentine's Day massacre, assisting Capone. Capone might have ordered it after Bugs' gang machine-gunned Al Capone's headquarters.
  • American Samoa officially becomes a U.S. territory

    American Samoa officially becomes a U.S. territory
    unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of the sovereign state of Samoa (formerly known as Western Samoa). The main (largest and most populous) island is Tutuila, with the Manuʻa Islands, Rose Atoll, and Swains Island also included in the territory
  • The Museum of Modern Art opens to the public in New York City

    The Museum of Modern Art opens to the public in New York City
    The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, on 53rd Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. It has been important in developing and collecting modernist art, and is often identified as the most influential museum of modern art in the world
  • Frozen vegetables, packaged by Clarence Birdseye, become the first frozen food to go on sale

    Frozen vegetables, packaged by Clarence Birdseye, become the first frozen food to go on sale
    In 1910 and 1911, Birdseye captured several hundred small mammals and isolated several thousand ticks for research into the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. His next field assignment, off and on from 1912 to 1915, was in Labrador in the Dominion of Newfoundland (now part of Canada), where he became further interested in food preservation by freezing, especially fast freezing. He was taught by the Inuit how to ice fish under very thick ice. In -40°C weather, he discovered that the fish he c
  • Empire State Building opens in New York City

    Empire State Building opens in New York City
    The Empire State Building is a 102-story landmark in New York City, United States, at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. It is 1,250 ft (381 meters) tall.] Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world's tallest building for 40 years, from its completion in 1931 until construction of the World Trade Center's North Tower was completed in 1972. Following the destruction of the World Trade Center in 2001, the Empire State Building
  • Japanese invasion of Manchuria

    Japanese invasion of Manchuria
    the day after the Mukden Incident, the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters, which had decided upon a policy of localizing the incident, communicated its decision to the Kwantung Army command.
  • Ford introduces the Model B, the first low-priced car to have a V-8 engine

    Ford introduces the Model B, the first low-priced car to have a V-8 engine
    The Model B was a Ford automobile with production starting with model year 1932 and ending with 1934. It was a much updated version of the Model A and was replaced by the 1935 Ford Model 48. Strictly speaking, the Model B was a four-cylinder car with an improved version of the engine used in the Model A, but Ford also began producing a very similar car with Ford's new flathead V‑8 engine. The V‑8 car was marketed as the Model 18, though it is commonly called the Ford V‑8, and, other than the eng
  • Glass–Steagall Act

    Glass–Steagall Act
    The first Glass-Steagall Act of 1932 was enacted in an effort to stop deflation, and expanded the Federal Reserve's ability to offer rediscounts on more types of assets, such as government bonds as well as commercial paper
  • Dust Bowl begins, causing major ecological and agricultural damage to the Great Plains states; severe drought, heat waves and other factors were contributors

    Dust Bowl begins, causing major ecological and agricultural damage to the Great Plains states; severe drought, heat waves and other factors were contributors
    The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940). The phenomenon was caused by severe drought coupled with decades of extensive farming without crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops or other techniques to prevent wind erosion. Deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains had displaced the natural deep-rooted grasses that nor
  • more than half a million students attened school

    more than half a million students attened school
    the curriculum expanded to include courses in science, ciics, and social studies
  • Works Progress Administration

    Works Progress Administration
    (renamed during 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unskilled workers to carry out public works projects.including the construction of public buildings and roads, and operated large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. It fed children and redistributed food, clothing, and housing. Almost every community in the United States had a park, bridge or school constructed by the agency, which especially benefi
  • Alcoholics Anonymous founded

    Alcoholics Anonymous founded
    (AA) is an international mutual aid movement declaring its "primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety." Now claiming more than 2 million members, AA was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (Bill W. and Dr. Bob) in Akron, Ohio
  • Revenue Act of 1935

    Revenue Act of 1935
    The 1935 Act was popularly known at the time as the "Soak the Rich" tax. It raised tax rates on incomes above $50,000. The Act did little to increase federal tax revenue, and it did not significantly redistribute income. Nonetheless, the bill was very popular and many believed it was a radical departure from tradition.Business leaders and the wealthy were upset about this and other of Roosevelt's policies and called him a traitor against his own class.