Block 2 LaMothe Nathan World History 2017

Timeline created by NateLamotheB2
  • 1300

    The Renaissance Begins

    The Renaissance Begins
    From the french word for rebirth. It followed the Middle Ages. Involved a surge in classical scholarship and values or ideas like humanism. Greeks and Romans looked to as examples. Created and was helped by a massive art movement. Political and religious branches form/break from old systems or replace them in some regions. BOOKS!!! Trade and commerce grow. It lasts until 1650.
  • 1347

    Black Death Arrives

    Black Death Arrives
    The exact arrival time is supposedly Oct 1347, but it takes until 1350 for it to arrive in some places. It ravages 1/3-2/3 of population. Most likely came from the mongols in Asia. Panic and mania caused people to turn on each other. Many thought it was divine punishment, creating fanatics and flagellants. It spread quickly due to bad sanitation and new trade routes.
  • May 30, 1431

    Joan of Arc Burned at the Stake

    Joan of Arc Burned at the Stake
    She was convicted of heresy. She fought for the french in the hundred years war. Claimed to hear voices of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret. She fought in Orleans and helped the french to rally and win. Wounded in several battles, often would go back to fighting. Sentenced to life imprisonment by english until discovered in male clothes during sentence.
  • 1440

    Johannes Gutenburg Printing Press

    Johannes Gutenburg Printing Press
    It helped to inspire and spread renaissance and reformation ideas. The first book printed this way was the bible. This printing press featured movable, reusable metal letters. It made printed material much cheaper. It was built from a wine press. It created an explosion of printed materials.
  • May 29, 1453

    Fall of Constantinople

    Fall of Constantinople
    Constantinople's fall at the hand of the Ottoman Turks really shook Christian Europe. Some sight it as the beginning of the end for the European middle ages. Mehmed II, the guy who conquered the city, used cannons as a sharp strategic advantage against the fortified city. Mehmed II was 20 when he conquered the city. This loss immediately prompted Pope Nicholas V to call for a crusade, which didn't quite happen.
  • Nov 1, 1478

    Start of the Spanish Inquisition

    Start of the Spanish Inquisition
    The Spanish Inquisition was a judicial system set up to combat heresy in Spain. Many non-christians were persecuted and killed, in addition to many christians. This event had the effect of strengthening Spain's monarchy. It is estimated that around 2,000 people were burned at the stake. Additionally, the monarchs issued an edict to all jews to be exiled or baptized, leading to the exodus of 160,000 jews from Spain.
  • Oct 12, 1492

    Christopher Columbus Lands in the New World

    Christopher Columbus Lands in the New World
    Christopher Columbus was an Italian explorer who sailed from Spain to the East Indies and South America. The first thee times he tried to get funding and support it was rejected. Finally, he was sponsored by Isabella and Ferdinand of Spain in 1486. He believed that the new world was the far east of Asia. Unsurprisingly, his harsh treatment of the natives got him arrested and caused him to loose his title as governor of the Indies.
  • 1506

    Mona Lisa Completed

    Mona Lisa Completed
    This was painted by Leonardo Da Vinci. It is a portrait of Lisa Gherardini; it was commissioned by her husband. The name means "My Lady, Lisa" in Italian, but it has a spelling mistake (it's supposed to be "Monna Lisa"). The painting has two fully painted layers underneath it of her in different poses. It is now under a lot of security as it has had a stone hit it, and an attempt to destroy it with acid has also been made.
  • 1508

    Michelangelo Begins Painting the Sistine Chapel

    Michelangelo Begins Painting the Sistine Chapel
    He was hired in 1508 by Pope Julius II. Raphael and Bramante, his rivals, hoped he would fail due to his art being predominately sculptures. The paintings show old testament stories going from the creation story to the story of Noah. The first scene painted was the scene with Noah, but the figures were too small. As you move further towards the creation story, the figures slowly become larger. He also painted fake architectural molding to frame them. He painted until 1512.
  • 1513

    "The Prince" is written

    "The Prince" is written
    This was written by Niccolò Machiavelli. It's a political work made during the Renaissance. It's a guide on how to rule, but a few think that it is supposed to be satyrical and be about how not to rule. Focuses on autocratic governments. Has a lot of information over the many facets of ruling.
  • Oct 31, 1517

    Martin Luther Posts 95 Theses

    Martin Luther Posts 95 Theses
    The document is written in latin, because it was meant for church officials and not for the common people. It attacked the church's selling of "indulgences". It was the spark for the protestant reformation. Came out of theology and comparing it to what the church said was right and wrong. He thought that salvation could only be earned through faith and divine grace, not church. Got condemned as a heretic by the pope. He refused recanting at the Diet of Worms. He translated the Bible to German.
  • Aug 13, 1521

    Cortes Conquers the Aztecs

    Cortes Conquers the Aztecs
    Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capitol, was founded in 1325 AD. The conquered peoples disliked Aztec rule, but the Aztec army kept the empire together. Hernan Cortes was a Spanish born noble who came to the new world as a conquistador. Hernan Cortes was helped in his expedition by his future wife, Malinche, who was fluent in Spanish, Maya, and Aztec. Weirdly, the year Cortes came to the Aztecs (1519) was the same year they expected heavenly messengers. After a three month siege, Cortes beat the Aztecs.
  • Sep 25, 1555

    Peace of Augsburg

    Peace of Augsburg
    This document was the first legal document securing the coexistence of Lutheranism and Catholicism in Germany. Allowed princes to choose the religion of their state. The meetings were set up by Charles V but he refused to attend any of them. This was a movement towards religious tolerance. This treaty didn't allow other forms of protestantism, like Calvinism, which would see allowance later with the Peace of Westphalia.
  • First Spanish Armada

    First Spanish Armada
    The armada was sent by Phillip II of Spain towards England to invade. Partly derived from his want to turn all of Europe into a Roman Catholic region. Also spurned on by Elisabeth's pirates attacking his fleets. The fleet took two years to build and prepare. Sir Francis Drake used flaming ships to drive off the Spanish armada, which left them vulnerable for attack.
  • Edict of Nantes

    Edict of Nantes
    Edict by Henry IV of France to grant religious tolerance and relative freedom to Huguenots, in conjunction with his own conversion from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. Ended the Wars of Religion in France. Granted protestants civil rights and freedom to worship everywhere but Paris. It divided areas into Catholic and Protestant to avoid further spreading of Protestantism. So disliked by Catholics that the rules it set up were bent and, not too long after, annulled.
  • William Shakespeare's Death

    William Shakespeare's Death
    William Shakespeare, or the "Bard of Avon", was a very famous playwright. He performed in the Lord Chamberlain's Men company (later King's Men), starting there in about 1594. Unfortunately, the most we know about his is from church records and his own plays, poems, and sonnets. By 1599, Shakespeare and his business partners had built the Globe theater. His writing style was distinct for the time, so it attracted wealthy and poor alike.
  • Petition of Right

    Petition of Right
    It was a petition to Charles I detailing several breaches of law. Document primarily focused on taxation, and the need for Parliament's allowance. It also disallowed imprisonment without cause. Finally, it prohibits the quartering of soldiers on the people and the use of martial law in a time of peace. This document was signed by Charles I due to his need for funding, but he later ignored the terms he 'agreed' to.
  • King Charles I executed

    King Charles I executed
    Charles I had a long history of needing and trying to get himself money. Multiple times, Parliament forced him to sign bills and tried to get him to stop abusing his power. This reached a climax when he went against the documents he signed, finally sparking war. The Roundheads won, resulting in a full loss of power. He was executed after a trial, being the first monarch in europe to be legally killed by their own people.
  • Lord George McCartney Expelled

    Lord George McCartney Expelled
    PHOTO
    George McCartney was a political man. He had many accomplishments, including negotiating an alliance with Russia's Catherine II. He was sent to the British embassy in China to negotiate trade. It is a myth that he was expelled from China for not bowing and paying respects to the Chinese emperor. It is more likely that the different and competing worldviews caused China to push British officials out.
  • Period:
    1096
    to
    1291

    The Crusades

    There were eight major expeditions. it began when Emperor Alexius I asked Pope Urban II for troops to fight the turkish threat to the Byzantine Empire. The goal was to capture the Holy Land under Christian control. The christians captured and lost Jerusalem multiple times. The fourth crusade was directed at Constantinople. After the fourth crusade, most crusade movements were to attack perceived enemies of the church.
  • Period:
    1185
    to

    Era of the Samurai

    The samurai were a warrior class of Japan. Unlike the myths and stories of ninjas, the samurai were a semi-aristocratic group that comprised of people from warlords to horsemen. They were swordsmen, stereotyped for using the katana, but they also used other swords, like the kodachi. The presence of samurai caused a military, fuedal society to develop in Japan. During the last 250 years of their existence, the term samurai was more of a class or status symbol.
  • Period:
    1337
    to
    1453

    Hundred Years War

    Fighting between France and England. It, actually, lasted over a hundred years. The king of England vied for the French throne during the war. The Treaty of Calais gave King Edward III sovereign control over the land he owned as a vassal. It started back up when Charles V tried to lay claim to parts of France during a French internal struggle over who is the successor to the king (Charles VI, who was insane, couldn't rule).
  • Period:
    1441
    to

    Slave Trade

    1441 is the first recorded date when African people were taken as slaves by Europeans, but the first record of them in the new world is 1502. While many countries had stopped importing slaves, 1867 was the year of the last slave ship voyage. The middle passage, or journey from Africa on overcrowded ships, was horrific, as told by Olaudah Equiano, who experienced it. For every 100 slaves that made it, 40 died in Africa or on the Middle Passage. About 11,328,000 slaves were shipped from Africa.
  • Period:
    1492
    to

    Colombian Exchange

    Started by Columbus when he brought flora and fauna back from the americas. Ravaged the americas with new diseases. Partly set up system for triangle trade. Its impact affected cultures way after. Allowed for cash crop plantations and encomienda.
  • Period:
    Apr 21, 1509
    to
    Jan 28, 1547

    King Henry VIII Reign

    He split from the Roman Catholic Church to divorce his wife. He had six wives in total. His first two wives had daughters. His third wife finally had a boy who was his heir. He gave himself the title of "Supreme Head of the Church of England". His church policies caused many to rebel and flee. His first daughter was catholic and his second was protestant.
  • Period:
    1530
    to

    Counter Reformation

    It was a movement in the Roman Catholic Church to address problems and reform. It started missionary movements like the Jesuits. Was partly to keep the Catholic church in its social standing and power. It unfortunately allowed for the Roman and Spanish Inquisitions. It featured efforts to better the church such as the Council of Trent.
  • Period:
    1547
    to

    Ivan the Terrible's Reign

    His father was killed when he was three, and he was proclaimed Grand Prince of Moscow, with his mom ruling in his name. His mother died when he was older, supposedly from poisoning. Due to the fighting of the boyars during this time, and the dislike it created for them, Ivan diminished their power and influence. Had an elite, black-clad police force that terrorized people in his kingdom. While being arguably mad for most of his rule, he went truly mad due to mercury poisoning, from pain meds.
  • Period:
    Nov 17, 1558
    to

    Queen Elisabeth's Reign

    She was the queen of England and Ireland. She was the daughter of King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, and she was declared illegitimate. She was the successor of "Bloody Mary". Ended a war with France and avoided one with Spain by using 'sea-dogs' and smart tactics. Known as "The Virgin Queen" due to her refusal to marry. She enjoyed practicing the arts and watching plays.
  • Period: to

    Opium War

    The first opium war was fought between China and Brittian. This was started by British merchants illicitly bringing opium into China, as the Chinese government tried to stop the trade. The British attacked a blockade and started many small fighting campaigns against the Chinese. This ended in a treaty allowing the British more trade ports and the island of Hong Kong (and money the Chinese paid them). The second opium war was a renewal of hostility, but with a new member of the fight, France.