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1953-1969

Timeline created by wicked-timelinez101 in History
Event Date: Event Title: Event Description:
Timeline small square Dwight D. Eisenhower inaugurated as president
Timeline small square Rosa Parks arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a public bus.
Timeline small square Governor Farbus of Arkansas brings in National Guard to prevent black students from going into a white school.
Timeline small square Sit in at Woolworth's lunch counter On February 1, 1960, four African American college students sat down at a lunch counter at Woolworth’s in Greensboro, North Carolina, and politely asked for service. Their request was refused. When asked to leave, they remained in their seats. Their passive resistance and peaceful sit-down demand helped ignite a youth-led movement to challenge racial inequality throughout the South.
Timeline small square Freedom riders bus burned six miles southwest of Anniston, Ala., May 14, 1961. the freedom bus was burned
Timeline small square The Other America written by Michael Harrington Michael Harrington’s book The Other America was an influential study of poverty in the United States, published in 1962 and it was a driving force behind the "war on poverty." The Boston Globe editorialized that Medicaid, Medicare, food stamps and expanded social security benefits were traceable to Harrington’s ideas. Harrington became the pre-eminent spokesman for Democratic socialism in America
Timeline small square MLK writes Letter from a Birmingham jail The Letter from Birmingham Jail or Letter from Birmingham City Jail, also known as The Negro Is Your Brother, is an open letter written on April 16, 1963, by Martin Luther King, Jr. an American civil rights leader. King wrote the letter from the city jail in Birmingham, Alabama, where he was confined after being arrested for his part in the Birmingham campaign, a planned non-violent protest conducted by the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and King's Southern Christian Leadership Conf
Timeline small square Peaceful demonstrators ruthlessly attacked in Birmingham, Alabama- MLK arrested. during the first week of May in 1963, Birmingham police and firefighters ruthlessly attacked civil rights demonstrators. Thousands were arrested and jailed, including children as young as six. The nation looked on in horror as the Associated Press sent out images of police beating demonstrators with batons and unleashing dogs onto the crowd, all while the Birmingham Fire Department hosed down the peaceful demonstration with fire hoses.
Timeline small square March on Washington The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in Washington, D.C., on August 28, 1963. Attended by some 250,000 people, it was the largest demonstration ever seen in the nation's capital, and one of the first to have extensive television coverage.
Timeline small square "I have a dream" speech given by Martin Luther King MLK gives his famous "I have a dream" speech.
Timeline small square John F. Kennedy assasinated The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, at 12:30 p.m. Central Standard Time (18:30 UTC) in Dealey Plaza. Kennedy was fatally shot while riding with his wife Jacqueline in a Presidential motorcade.
Timeline small square Lyndon B. Johnson becomes President Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969 after his service as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963. He is one of four Presidents who served in all four elected Federal offices of the United States: Representative, Senator, Vice President and President.
Timeline small square 24th amendment passed The Twenty-fourth Amendment (Amendment XXIV) prohibits both Congress and the states from conditioning the right to vote in federal elections on payment of a poll tax or other types of tax. The amendment was proposed by Congress to the states on August 27, 1962, and was ratified by the states on January 23, 1964.
Timeline small square Civil Rights bill passed The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88-352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) was a landmark piece of legislation in the United States that outlawed major forms of discrimination against blacks and women, and ended racial segregation in the United States. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public ("public accommodations").
Timeline small square Malcom x dies Malcom X Assassinated by gunfire
Timeline small square Voting rights act 1965 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88-352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) was a landmark piece of legislation in the United States that outlawed major forms of discrimination against blacks and women, and ended racial segregation in the United States. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public ("public accommodations").
Timeline small square Watts riots The term Watts Riots of 1965 refers to a large-scale riot which lasted 6 days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in August 1965. By the time the riot subsided, 34 people had been killed, 1,032 injured, and 3,438 arrested. It would stand as the most severe riot in Los Angeles history until the Los Angeles riots of 1992. The riot is viewed by some as a reaction to the record of police brutality by the LAPD and other racial injustices suffered by black Americans in Los Angeles
Timeline small square Martin Luther King Jr. assasinated At 6:01 p.m. on April 4, 1968, a shot rang out. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who had been standing on the balcony of his room at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, TN, now lay sprawled on the balcony's floor. A gaping wound covered a large portion of his jaw and neck. A great man who had spent thirteen years of his life dedicating himself to nonviolent protest had been felled by a sniper's bullet.
Timeline small square Forced busing begins Desegregation busing in the United States (also known as forced busing or simply busing) is the practice of assigning and transporting students to schools in such a manner as to redress prior racial segregation of schools, or to overcome the effects of residential segregation on local school demographics
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