The Life and Times of Mary MacKillop

Timeline created by kayc28
In History
  • Mary is born

    Mary is born
    Mary MacKillop was born on the 15 January at Brunswick St, Fitzroy, Melbourne. She was Baptised 28 February, in the first St Francis church, a temporary building made of second hand floorboards. The foundation stone had been laid the previous year for the current building which is Melbourne’s first Catholic Church. <p>St Francis Church</p>
    Image used with thanks to Picture Australia and Pictures Collection, State Library
  • Sydney declared a city

    Sydney declared a city
    On 20 July 1842 the municipal council of Sydney was incorporated and the town was declared the first city in Australia, with John Hosking the first elected mayor. <p>History of Sydney</p>
    Image of Sydney 1842 used with thanks to Picture Australia.
  • Melbourne declared a town.

    Melbourne declared a town.
    On 12 August 1842, Melbourne was incorporated as a "town" by Act 6 Victoria No. 7 of the Governor and Legislative Council of New South Wales.<p>Marvellous Melbourne </p>
    Image with thanks to National Library of Australia
  • Gold is discovered - the Gold Rushes begin.

    Gold is discovered - the Gold Rushes begin.
    In 1851, Edward Hargraves discovered a 'grain of gold' in a waterhole near Bathurst. This first discovery led to the Gold Rushes that continued throughout the 1850's and 1860's.<p>The Australian Gold Rushes </p>
    Image with thanks to Picture Australia
  • Eureka Stockade

    Eureka Stockade
    The Eureka rebellion is considered by some historians to be the birthplace of Australian democracy. It is the only Australian example of armed rebellion leading to reform of unfair laws. <p>Eureka Stockade</p>
    Image used with thanks to Picture Australia and the State Library of Victoria.
  • Meeting Fr Julian Tenison Woods

    Meeting Fr Julian Tenison Woods
    While working as a governess for the Cameron Family, Mary MacKillop met Fr Julian Tenison Woods, who would be influential in the future development of the Josephite order.<p>Julian Tenison Woods</p>
    Portrait of Reverend J.E.T. Woods with thanks to Picture Australia and National Library of Australia
  • Burke and Wills begin Expedition to cross Australia from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

    Burke and Wills begin Expedition to cross Australia from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpentaria.
    In 1860-61 Robert O'Hara Burke and William John Wills led an expedition of 19 men with the intention of crossing Australia from Melbourne in the south to the Gulf of Carpentaria in the north, a distance of around 3,250 kilometres Although they successfully reached the Gulf, both of the expedition's leaders died on the return journey. <p>The Journey of Burke and Wills </p>Image thanks to Picture Australia
  • 'Stable School' opened by Mary MacKillop

    'Stable School' opened by Mary MacKillop
    After renovations by their brother, a school was opened in a stable in Penola, South Australia. Mary and her sisters Annie and Lexie started teaching more than fifty children. Mary wor a black dress, to signify her dedication to God. The school opened on St Joseph's Day. <p> Penola - where it all began</p>Image with thanks to Picture Australia and Mortlock Pictorial Collection, State Library of South Australia.
  • Mary takes religious vows and begins the Josephite order.

    Mary takes religious vows and begins the Josephite order.
    Mary became the first sister and mother superior of the order of the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart. Dedicated to the education of the children of the poor, it was the first religious order to be founded by an Australian. The Josephites followed rules that had a dependence on divine providence, no ownership of belongings and faith that God would provide.
    <p>Sisters of St Joseph</p>
  • Mary MacKillop opens first Adelaide school

    Mary MacKillop opens first Adelaide school
    Mary along with her small group of Sisters founded a new school at the request of Bishop Laurence Sheil.<p>
    Image thanks to Michael Gorey</p>
  • First Royal visit to Australia

    First Royal visit to Australia
    The 1867-68 visit of the little-known Prince Alfred, son of Queen Victoria to Australia was the very first by a member of the British Royal family. The tour - to Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane - was tumultuous, to say the least. It produced an outpouring of national exaltation ... and of national shame following an assassination attempt on the Prince. <p>Royal visits to Australia</p>Image in the Public Domain
  • Transportation of convicts to Western Australia ceases

    Transportation of convicts to Western Australia ceases
    The last convict ship to Western Australia, the Hougoumont, departed Britain in 1867 and arrived in Western Australia on 10 January 1868. Western Australia was the last state to receive convicts from England. <p>Convict transportation to Australia</p>Image is James Wilson, a convict transported to Western Australia in 1867 - in the Public Domain.
  • Last full blood Tasmanian Aboriginal Male dies

    Last full blood Tasmanian Aboriginal Male dies
    William Lanne (also known as King Billy or William Laney) (c. 1835 - March 3, 1869) was a Tasmanian Aborigine, and third husband of Truganini. He is most well-known as the last full-blooded Aboriginal Tasmanian man. Only half a century earlier, the Tasmanian Aboriginal population was approximately 7,000. <p>Learn more about the Indigenous People of Tasmania</p>Image in the Public Domain.
  • First Brisbane school opened by Mary MacKillop

    First Brisbane school opened by Mary MacKillop
    Mary MacKillop and five other Sisters arrived in Queensland on 31 December, 1869, invited by James Quinn, 1st Catholic bishop of Brisbane & founder of Catholic Education in Queensland. The Sisters offered Catholic education to working class children, opening St Mary's in South Brisbane. <p>Footprints from the Past - a Brisbane walking pilgrimage</p>Image with thanks to Picture Australia.
  • Mary MacKillop excommunicated from the Catholic Church

    Mary MacKillop excommunicated from the Catholic Church
    Mary and 47 sisters were expelled from the Sisters of St Joseph. During this time Mary dressed incognito. She had been ordered not to communicate with any of the sisters and anyone associating with her was liable to excommunication. After five months, when Bishop Sheil lay dying, he realised his mistake and revoked the excommunication on 23 February 1872. <p>A rebel and a saint</p> Image: Picture Australia
  • Mary makes a Pilgrimage to Rome

    Mary makes a Pilgrimage to Rome
    MacKillop travelled to Rome in 1873 to seek papal approval for the religious congregation and was encouraged in her work by Pope Pius IX. While in Europe, MacKillop travelled widely to observe educational methods. <p>Virtual Pilgrimage: Rome</p>Image of Pope Pius IX with thanks to Alice Priest.
  • First telephone call made in Australia

    First telephone call made in Australia
    Australia's first telephone service (connecting the Melbourne and South Melbourne offices of Robinson Brothers) was launched in 1879, with the first telephone exchange opened in Melbourne in 1880. Around 7,757 calls were handled in 1884.<p>History of Telecommunications in Australia</p>Image thanks to Antique Gadgets.
  • Ned Kelly captured at Glenrowan

    Ned Kelly captured at Glenrowan
    The famous bushranger, Ned Kelly was finally caught after a bloody gunfight and a two day long siege. It was the only time he wore his famous armour.He was tried and sentenced to hang. <p>The Glenrowan Siege, 1880</p> Image in the public domain.
  • Australia's first census

    Australia's first census
    Australia's population in 1881 was 2 250 194. The census was held across all colonies. Compared with today's population of 22 000 000, Australia during Mary MacKillop's life sparsely populated. <p>Animated Population Chart: 1788-2010</p> Image from the Australian Bureau of Statistics
  • The first Josephite foundation is established in Temuka New Zealand

    The first Josephite foundation is established in Temuka New Zealand
    St Joseph's Church in Temuka New Zealand has stood since 1879, four years before the Sisters arrived.<p><a href='http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=NZT18830413.1.11&e=-------10--31----2"Thomas+Rooney+"-ARTICLE-' >Article from 1883 on St Joseph's Church Temuka</a></p> Photo in the public domain.
  • Australia's first journal for women published

    Australia's first journal for women published
    Louisa Lawson, mother of great writer Henry Lawson was a strong activitst for women's rights, which were almost non-existent in the 1880's. 'Half of Australian women's lives are unhappy, but there are paths out of most labyrinths ... we shall welcome contributions and correspondence from women ... it is not a new thing to say there is no power in the world like that of women.' Louisa Lawson, The Dawn, Issue 1
    <p> Louisa Lawson </p>
  • The Josephite Order officially recognised as a Canonical Congregation

    The Josephite Order officially recognised as a Canonical Congregation
    Pope Leo XIII decreed that the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart order was an approved Regular Congregation, with its Mother House to be in Sydney, led by Mother Bernard as the Superior General.<p>Photo in the public domain.</p>
  • Shearers strike leads to development of Labour Party

    Shearers strike leads to development of Labour Party
    The Shearers' Strike of 1891 was one of Australia’s first big industrial disputes. More than 1000 men downed shears and marched through the streets demanding better conditions.The limitations of industrial action & the need for a political party to represent working people led to the future formation of the Australian Labor Party, the 1st political party in Australia<p>Shearer's Strike!</p> Image source: www.actu.org.au
  • Waltzing Matilda performed publicly for the first time

    Waltzing Matilda performed publicly for the first time
    At the North Gregory Hotel in Winton, Queensland, the poem Waltzing Mathilda, by Banjo Paterson was sung for the first time. The occasion was a banquet for the Premier of Queensland, Hugh Nelson. <p>Who'll Come a Waltzing Mathilda with Me?</p>Image sourced from the National Library of Australia.
  • Mary is elected Superior General of the Josephite Order

    Mary is elected Superior General of the Josephite Order
    After the death of Mother Bernard Walsh, Mary was elected Superior General of the Josephite order, a position she held until her death. She was finally recognised as the leader of the order she founded.
  • Federation

    Federation
    Australia became an independent nation on 1st January 1901. The British Parliament passed legislation allowing the six Australian colonies to govern in their own right as part of the Commonwealth of Australia. <p>The story of Federation</p>Image from National Library of Australia.
  • Mary battles illness once again

    Mary battles illness once again
    Mary's doctor advised her that the mineral baths in Rotorua in New Zealand would ease her health conditions. She travelled there with her sister, but unfortunately suffered a debilitating stroke which paralysed her down one side. She continued her work however, her mind and speech unaffected. <p>Mary's time in New Zealand</p>The image is of Thirwell House, where Mary and her sister stayed in Rotorua.
  • Mary passes away

    Mary passes away
    Mary had worked so hard, and faced many hardships and illnesses in her life. She died the Josephite convent in North Sydney and was laid to rest at the Gore Hill Cemetery. So many people took soil from her grave site that her body was moved on 27 January 1914, to a vault before the altar of the Mother of God in the newly built Memorial Chapel in Mount Street, Sydney.<p>Take a virtual tour of Mary's resting place</p>
  • Mary's Beatification

    Mary's Beatification
    Presentation of the Official Commemorative portrait of the Blessed Mary MacKillop to His Holiness Pope John Paul II on the day of her Beatification, 19 January, 1995. <p>Learn more about Mary's beatification and the process involved. </p>Photo source: http://www.sosj.org.au/mary/photos/20.html
  • Mary recognised a Saint

    Mary recognised a Saint
    Pope Benedict XVI will recognise Mary Mackillop as St Mary of the Cross in Rome at the ceremony of Canonisation. After years of working towards this, the Sisters of St Joseph will celebrate their founder's wonderful works and continued inspiration with the rest of the world. <p>Mary's path to Canonisation</p>
  • Period: to

    Mary's challenges - difficult times with local Bishops

    During this time period, Mary and her sisters were asked to leave three different dioceses - Bathurst in 1876, Brisbane in 1879 and Adelaide in 1883. In the main, the reason was because Mary insisted that the sisters rule themselves, and not be under the jurisdiction of the Bishops, as was the normal procedure. Despite these challenges, Mary continued her work, supported by her faithful sisters, eventually establishing a presence throughout Australia.