2017 Ray Lee Dalat World History

Timeline created by Asassinator(Ray)
In History
  • 12,000 BCE

    3.1: Fertile Crescent: First humans arrive

    3.1: Fertile Crescent: First humans arrive
    The first hunter-gatherer groups settled in Mesopotamia 12,000 years ago.
  • 12,000 BCE

    4.1: Egypt: Hunter Gatherers arrive

    4.1: Egypt: Hunter Gatherers arrive
    Ancient hunter gatherers, like the ones from Mesopotamia, moved to the Nile Valley around 12,000 years ago. They learned how to farm and made small villages. It was also they who formed the Lower and Upper Egypt.
  • 7,000 BCE

    3.1: Mesopotamia: Hunter gatherers FARM

    3.1: Mesopotamia: Hunter gatherers FARM
    Around 7,000 BC, the hunter gatherers use silt from the floods to farm crops.
  • 7,000 BCE

    6.1: First civilizations begin in the Huang He

    6.1: First civilizations begin in the Huang He
    Almost all ancient civilizations began along rivers. China is no exception, for they're civilization starts in the Huang He river, meaning Yellow River. They started farming along the river, because of the silt deposits.
  • 3,500 BCE

    3.2: Mesopotamia-First city

    3.2: Mesopotamia-First city
    Due to food surpluses and division of labor, cities were made as a place for trading. Cities also provided leaders. One of the more known cities was Sumer.
  • 3,100 BCE

    4.1: Egypt: Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt

    4.1: Egypt: Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt
    A century after Upper and Lower Egypt were formed, a man called Menes became leader of Upper, his goal now is to finish what the previous king, Scorpion failed to do: unify both parts of Egypt. Menes succeeded in doing so when he attacked Lower Egypt. He was the first pharoh of Egypt and wore the double crown.
  • 2,700 BCE

    4.2: Rise Of The Old Kingdom

    4.2: Rise Of The Old Kingdom
    As the Third Dynasty rose to power, so came the Old Kingdom. It lasted for around 5 centuries. It lasted from approximately 2700BC to 2200BC.
  • 2,300 BCE

    5.1: India: Harappan Civilization

    5.1: India: Harappan Civilization
    The Harappan Civilization was the first civilization to thrive. It was named after the modern day Harrapa, the city where it's ruins were found. The greatest sources of this civilization are the remains of it's to greatest cities, Harrapa and Monhenjo Daro.
  • 2,000 BCE

    3.3: Mesopotamia: The Epic of Gilgamesh was written

    3.3: Mesopotamia: The Epic of Gilgamesh was written
    The Epic Of Gilgamesh is currently the oldest epic in the world. It was carved in stone tablets, and the actual Gilgamesh, king of the city Uruk, lived 700 years before the epic.
  • 2,000 BCE

    5.1: India: Aryan's arrival

    5.1: India: Aryan's arrival
    After the collapse of the Harrapan civilization, the Aryans came in from the North and became the dominant group in India for that time.
  • 1,800 BCE

    3.4: Babylon: Rise of the Babylonians

    3.4: Babylon: Rise of the Babylonians
    After Ur was destroyed in 2000BC, the Babylonians took over by 1800BC. Their ruler was Hammurabi, who was the cities greatest monarch.
  • 1,595 BCE

    3.4: Asia Minor: Development of the chariot

    3.4: Asia Minor: Development of the chariot
    The Hitties master ironworking and therefore were able to create wheels and, soon after, chariots. It allowed Hittite soldiers to move quickly in battle. After this, they used the chariots to take over Babylon.
  • 1,550 BCE

    4.3: The New Kingdom of Egypt

    4.3: The New Kingdom of Egypt
    The New Kingdom brought a whole new world of trade. It was also the longest lasting kingdom: it had been around for 500 years! It was ruled by many pharaohs, but the most famous one is Queen Hatshepsut.
  • 1,400 BCE

    5.2: India: Sikhism founded

    5.2: India: Sikhism founded
    Sikhism was formed centuries after Jainism. Founded by Guru (teacher in Sanskrit) Nanak, Sikhism is monotheistic. Nanak was raised Hindu but didn't the way they did things, so he travelled to many places and got in contact with many religions, including Islam.
  • 1,200 BCE

    6.1: China: Bones and shells are used for Chinese writing

    6.1: China: Bones and shells are used for Chinese writing
    Chinese writing, although gone through many changes, originated from the Shang Dynasty. Ancient priests used to write on cattle bones and turtle shells. This was because they thought that by "reading" the cracks they could predict the future! These bones were then called oracle bones.
  • 1,000 BCE

    16.1: Guatemala: Start of the Mayan Civilization

    16.1: Guatemala: Start of the Mayan Civilization
    During this period, the Mayans began settling in Northen Guatemala. They grew maize (corn), and hunted animals for food. There they started making tiny villages and eventually traded with other villages to expand.
  • -900 BCE

    8.1: Greece: The Classical Age begins.

    8.1: Greece: The Classical Age begins.
    This Classical Age occurs 300 years after the fall of Mycenae. This era brought in city-states when some Greeks banded together for protection. This is also the time when Acropolises, city-states on mountains.
  • -751 BCE

    4.5: Kush: Kush's Conquest of Egypt

    4.5: Kush: Kush's Conquest of Egypt
    After being driven away by the Kushites the first time they invaded it, Egypt was very weak. That led to the Kushites capturing Upper Egypt.
  • -600 BCE

    8.3: Athens: Aesop's Fables were written

    8.3: Athens: Aesop's Fables were written
    Although it is unclear, Aesop supposedly started writing these fables during the mid-to-late 6th century BC. There are 725 fables, most having a moral to teach the reader.
  • -551 BCE

    6.2: China: Confucius was born

    6.2: China: Confucius was born
    Confucius was the inventor of the widely known philosophy called Confucianism. He is the most influential teacher in Chinese history!
  • -550 BCE

    9.1: Persian Empire: Cyrus takes control

    9.1: Persian Empire: Cyrus takes control
    In 700BC, a people called Medes ruled over the Persians. 150 years later, a man named Cyrus led a revolt against the Medes, they won and now Cyrus was the leader of the Persian Empire.
  • -535 BCE

    5.3: India: The Great Departure

    5.3: India: The Great Departure
    As Prince Siddhartha Gautama turns 30, he left his home to find answers for his question of life. He went to great distances to find the answers, asking priests and people known for their wisdom, but he didn't find any. Not yet, at least.
  • -500 BCE

    8.2: Athens: Democracy

    8.2: Athens: Democracy
    Nearing the end of tyranny, a man named Cleisthenes was ruler. He didn't want aristocrats to rule, so with the influence of the people, he overthrew the aristocracy. And by doing that, democracy was born. Cleisthenes is often called the father of democracy.
  • -481 BCE

    6.2: China: The beginning of the Warring States Period

    6.2: China: The beginning of the Warring States Period
    When invaders came to attack the Zhou and succeeded, the lords began to fight each other for power. The Warring States period began like this. They were a bunch of Civil Wars happening, sons were killing fathers, fathers were killing sons, it was chaos.
  • -458 BCE

    10.1: Rome: Cincinnatus takes power

    10.1: Rome: Cincinnatus takes power
    Although he started as a farmer, Cincinnatus, the famous early Roman Republic dictator (what a long description), took control of Rome to defend it from the city’s enemies. After that, he resigned almost immediately and people admired him for that.
  • -450 BCE

    10.2: Rome: The 12 Tables were written

    10.2: Rome: The 12 Tables were written
    During Rome’s Republican years, they needed a way to keep order because laws that weren’t written down were hard to remember, so Roman officials made the 12 Tables, a set of rules that were displayed in the Forum, Rome’s public meeting place.
  • -404 BCE

    9.2: Athens: End of the Peloponnesian War

    9.2: Athens: End of the Peloponnesian War
    The Delian League (Athens) and the Peloponnesian League (Sparta) fought each other for 3 decades, but in the end, Sparta defeated the Athenians because they had destroyed their food supply and left Athens starving.
  • -399 BCE

    9.4: Greece: The death of Socrates

    9.4: Greece: The death of Socrates
    Socrates (a.k.a the teacher of the teacher of the teacher of Alexander the Great) was a philosopher who wanted people to question their beliefs. He taught by asking questions. Many people didn't the idea of questioning their beliefs, so Socrates was condemned to death via drinking poison. He did this while his students watched.
  • -336 BCE

    9.3: Macedonia: Alexander takes the throne

    9.3: Macedonia: Alexander takes the throne
    Alexander the Great was Philip II's son. After the city of Thebes attempted to rebel, he annihilated them. This had started his conquest to capture more parts of Asia to add into his kingdom, including the Persian Empire.
  • -265 BCE

    5.4: India-Asoka converts to Buddhism

    5.4: India-Asoka converts to Buddhism
    After watching and fighting with his soldiers, Asoka, Candragupta's son, was traumatized. So after a few years into his reign, Asia turned to Buddhism and swore to never launch an attack ever again.
  • -221 BCE

    6.3: China: Shi Huangdi unified China

    6.3: China: Shi Huangdi unified China
    Shi Huagdi, also known as Ying Zheng, was the first ruler of the entirety of China. His name also stands for "first emperor". Shi Huangdi followed Legalistic beliefs to keep the new China under control.
  • -202 BCE

    10.3: Carthage: The Battle of Zama

    10.3: Carthage: The Battle of Zama
    During Hannibal’s attack on Italy, a Roman General, Scipio Africanus, led an army to Attack Carthage itself. This led Hannibal to fall back to Carthage and attempt to defeat Scipio. When they reached Zama,they were defeated by Scipio.
  • -200 BCE

    13.1: West Africa trading

    13.1: West Africa trading
    Gold and salt were West Africa’s most important that they used to trade. Salt was used to keep food from getting spoiled, and gold is just a shiny material that was very rare.
  • -31 BCE

    11.1: Egypt: Marc Anthony and Cleopatra dies

    11.1: Egypt: Marc Anthony and Cleopatra dies
    After his fleet being defeated by Octavian, Marc Anthony and his wife Cleopatra return to Egypt and take their lives there so that they won’t be taken prisoners by Octavian.
  • 30

    11.2: Rome: Jesus Crucified

    11.2: Rome: Jesus Crucified
    After Jesus got too much attention, the Romans didn't like him that much, and because of this, he was arrested, and sentenced to death via crucifixion. This was basically the beginning of the spread of Christianity.
  • 64

    6.2: Rome: Nero bans Christianity

    6.2: Rome: Nero bans Christianity
    When Christianity started to spread in Rome, Nero, the Emperor at that time, thought of this as a political problem. Because of this, he started persecuting Christians in groups, and this went on for several years until Constantine showed up and stopped it.
  • 105

    6.4: China: The invention of paper

    6.4: China: The invention of paper
    Cai Lun, born in 48AD, was the profound inventor of paper, something that everybody uses to write, scribble, draw, etc. The oldest appear book found was dated back to 256 AD. This type of paper is not to be mistaken with papyrus from Egypt, which came before this type of paper.
  • 200

    6.5: China: The Arrival of Buddhism

    6.5: China: The Arrival of Buddhism
    During the decline of the Han Dynasty (due to people ignoring laws and lots of violence), Buddhism was spreading from India to many places trading goods. While the decline was happening, Buddhism saved the day with their idea of an end to suffering.
  • 200

    13.4: West Africa: Griots

    13.4: West Africa: Griots
    The Griots were West Africa’s storytellers. Since they had no written language, the only way they could share their history with the next generation is by telling stories called oral history. They also used wise sayings called proverbs.
  • 300

    11.3: The Byzantine Empire

    11.3: The Byzantine Empire
    After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, The Eastern side adapted to Greek Cultures and became the Byzantine Empire, named after the land that Constantinople was built on.
  • 400

    17.1: Europe: The Northern European Plain

    17.1: Europe: The Northern European Plain
    The Norhtern European Plain is this big area of Europe that’s just flat land. Many area in Europe are mountainous: Italy, Scandanavia, Greece, etc. But the middle of Europe is where all the plains are. Many people farmed in this area.
  • 430

    17.2: Ireland: Patrick the Saint

    17.2: Ireland: Patrick the Saint
    Patrick was one of the first missionaries to travel to Northern Europe. Although many missionaries were sent by the pope (this made him the most powerful force that helped spread Christianity), Patrick wasn’t. He thought it was a good idea to bring Christianity to Ireland. Patrick was actually kidnapped as a teenager and was forced to work in Ireland as a shepherd. He escaped six years later, but returned to spread Christianity. After he died, they declared his to be a saint.
  • 490

    5.5: India-Panchatantra was produced

    5.5: India-Panchatantra was produced
    Before 500AD, near the end of Ancient India, a group of Indian writers produced a book called Panchatantra. This book of stories was all about teaching lessons. They praise people of cleverness and quick thinking. Each story has a message about things like winning friends wagaing wars, or some other idea. Kind of like Aesop's Fables.
  • 570

    12.1: Mecca: Muhammad the Prophet is born

    12.1: Mecca: Muhammad the Prophet is born
    Before the Islamic religion, Arabians were polytheistic. That changed when Muhammad was born. He was the prophet for Allah, which means “the God”, who told Muhammad that he was the only God. This led to monotheistic religion called Islam.
  • 589

    14.1: China: Reunification

    14.1: China: Reunification
    After 369 years of disorder (Period of Disunion), the different kingdoms ruled by military leaders were united. There are two big factors to this. Nomads settled in Northern China, mixing their culture with the citizens there. Some northern Chinese fled to southern China, so the cultures of the two mixed and more people became Chinese. Although this Period of Disunion was known for it’s many wars, people had been developing peace as well. Eventually, they two sides reunited into one big country.
  • 632

    12.2: Mecca: The Qur’an

    12.2: Mecca: The Qur’an
    The Qur’an is the holy book of Islam. It consists mostly of Muhammad's teachings and was formed after Muhammad’s death. This book also talks about there being only one God, Allah, and that Muhammad is his prophet.
  • 970

    14.2: China: Fast-Ripening rice

    14.2: China: Fast-Ripening rice
    The fast ripening rice was an invention from the Song Dynasty. It made farming much easier and created a food surplus, sprouting towns and cities. Eventually the population grew exponentially.
  • 970

    14.3: China: Neo-Confucianism

    14.3: China: Neo-Confucianism
    Neo Confucianism was developed during the Song dynasty, it was a philosophy mixture of Buddhism, Confucian, Daoist thoughts.
  • 1000

    17.4: Europe/Japan: Knights and Samurai

    17.4: Europe/Japan: Knights and Samurai
    Medieval Europe and Ancient Japan are very similar. They both have elite warriors who also share similarities. They both had a strict code they must follow, and they must live honorable and disciplined lives.
  • 1054

    18.1: Italy: King Henry IV begs for forgiveness

    18.1: Italy: King Henry IV begs for forgiveness
    After he was excommunicated by Pope Gregory VII, King Henry IV travelled to Canossa Castle in Italy, where the Pope was staying as a guest. He begged for forgiveness barefoot for three days. On the last day, the Pope forgave him. This proves the power of the Popes at that time.
  • 1060

    13.2: Almoravid’s invasions

    13.2: Almoravid’s invasions
    The Almoravids were African Muslims who attacked Ghana and took control of it. Although their reign didn’t last long, it had weakened the Empire because they had also closed their only ways of income: trade routes (and also taxes that came from that).
  • 1096

    18.2: Jerusalem: The First Crusade

    18.2: Jerusalem: The First Crusade
    The First crusade was one of the most successful ones of all of them. 5,000 crusaders marched to Jerusalem, with reclaiming it as their goal. They succeeded in doing so, but only for a short time.
  • 1200

    15.2: Japan: Architecture

    15.2: Japan: Architecture
    The Japanes admired Chinese architecture, and wanted to copy some of their ideas. For instance: they liked how the wooden frames on some of their buildings curved upwards, so they did the same thing, but on their Shinto temple gates. This is widely known to tourists who have been to Japan, and it’s loved by them too.
  • 1200

    17.3: Europe: The Decline Of Feudalism

    17.3: Europe: The Decline Of Feudalism
    The main reason for the decline of Feudalism were huge cities. Due to Europe’s increasing population, more towns develope, and existing towns expanded into the aforementioned cities. These cities also had a lot of trade businesses appearing. Many people wanted to make more money than their lords would offer, so they moved to towns. As the decline of peasants and serfs was happening rapidly, so was the Feudalism System.
  • 1200

    18.3: Europe: Francis of Assisi

    18.3: Europe: Francis of Assisi
    Francis of Assisi was the founder of the Franciscan Order.
  • 1274

    14.4: The Attack of Japan

    14.4: The Attack of Japan
    After the Mongols attacked and took over China, they were bored of it and went to invade Japan. Unfortunately for them, the huge storms broke their ships and forced them to retreat.
  • 1300

    15.1: Japan: The Ainu

    15.1: Japan: The Ainu
    The Ainu were hunter gatherers that came from Russia and lived in Hokkaido. They had their own language and religion. They also looked different from the Japanese. Over time, they tried to fight the locals for land, but failed miserably. Now there are still many Ainu living in Russia and Japan, but the population is unknown.
  • 1300

    19:1: Italy: Florence

    19:1: Italy: Florence
    Florence, ruled by Cosimo de’ Medici beck then, was a city full of trade and art. It was a very influential place with merchants coming in and out to buy and sell stuff all the time. It was very wealthy too, with the help of it’s leader.
  • 1325

    12.4: Morocco: Ibn Battutah

    12.4: Morocco: Ibn Battutah
    Ibn Battutah is considered one of the world’s greatest traveler. For around 30 years, Battutah has seen most of the Islamic world, North Africa and almost all of ASIA!!!
  • 1325

    16.2: New Mexico: Tenochtitlán

    16.2: New Mexico: Tenochtitlán
    This place was the capital of the Aztec Empire. it is located on an island, where New Mexico now stands. Tenochtitlán was a very beautiful place, inhabited by 200,000 people. It had huge temples, markets, and causeways.
  • 1350

    16.2: Aztec Empire: Human Sacrifices

    16.2: Aztec Empire: Human Sacrifices
    The Aztecs made the most human sacrifices out of the three empires. They would do up to 10,000 sacrifices a year. This is because they believe that the gods require blood to prevent disasters from happening.
  • 1453

    18.4: France: Joan Of Arc

    18.4: France: Joan Of Arc
    Joan Of Arc was a peasant that lived during the Hundred Years’ War. While the English troops were winning most of the battles, Joan rallied the French troops and raised their their spirits to defend their country. Although she was later captured and killed by the English, the French drove them out of their country.
  • 1455

    19.2: Germany: The printing press

    19.2: Germany: The printing press
    With it’s importance rivaling the food surplus, the printing press was a revolutionary invention made by Johann Gutenberg.This machine worked with a movable type, having letters that can be rearranged to form different words, sentences, paragraphs, and whole books!
  • 1492

    18.5: Spain: A Christian Land

    18.5: Spain: A Christian Land
    In 1492, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain conquered Granada, the last Muslim stronghold in Spain. In that year, they also forced all Spanish Jews to either convert to Christianity, or leave. They also banned the practice of Islam a few years later. Because of this, all of Spain became Christian.
  • 1494

    19.3: England: William Tyndale

    19.3: England: William Tyndale
    William Tyndale was the person who translated the Bible into English. He then spread it to the world using the printing press. He was then executed for doing so.
  • 1519

    20.2: Earth: Magellan

    20.2: Earth: Magellan
    Ferdinand Magellan’s Crew (not him, he died on the journey) were the first people to circumnavigate the planet. This means that they sailed accross the entire world. They did this in the span of 4 years.
  • 1520

    12.3: Ottoman Empire: Mehmed II

    12.3: Ottoman Empire: Mehmed II
    The Ottoman Empire started off with Mehmed II, also known as “the Conqueror”. Mehmed did a lot of things, two of which are the Janissaries and the conquering of the Byzantine Empire. Janissaries were Christian boys that were converted to soldiers, and Mehmed II defeated the Byzantine Empire, putting an end to the Roman Empire.
  • 1537

    16.3: Inca Empire: Collapse

    16.3: Inca Empire: Collapse
    Francisco Pizarro led 3 expeditions around South America, although the first 2 were a disaster, the 3rd expeditions was when he met the Incas. With only 180 men, he conquered the Empire, with the help of disease and horses.
  • 1543

    20.1: Earth: The Copernicus Theory

    20.1: Earth: The Copernicus Theory
    Nicolaus Copernicus was the first person to suggest a different idea from Ptolemy’s original idea. Ptolomey had said that the Earth was in the center, while the sun and other planets revolved around it. Copernicus, however, contradicted this idea, saying that the Sun was in the middle, while other planets, including earth, revolved around that instead.
  • 13.3: Songhai: Their Downfall

    13.3: Songhai: Their Downfall
    Morocco was a rival of Songhai. They wanted their salt mines to earn money! So they attacked with terrifying weapons, they even have the arquebus, the early form of a gun. Songhai was easily defeated by Morocco’s guns cannons.
  • 20.3: Europe: Market Economy

    20.3: Europe: Market Economy
    Europe’s population was growing, meaning that a lot of trading was happening too. This eventually led to the creation of market economy. In this system, the people get to decide what they want to buy or sell.
  • 15.3: Japan: Isolation

    15.3: Japan: Isolation
    Many Japanese people disliked the idea of interacting with other countries, so the ruling shogun in the 1630s banned any contact with the outside world. Guns were banned, trade routes were closed, and Christian missionaries were forced to leave.
  • 21.2: England: John Locke

    21.2: England: John Locke
    John Locke was a massive influence on Enlightenment political thought. He published a book that argued that government should be thought of as a contract between the ruler and their people. Since contracts bound both sides, the ruler’s power would be limited, benefiting the people at the same time.
  • 21.2: France: The French Reveloution

    21.2: France: The French Reveloution
    The commoners in France demanded more rights and the king to accept a constitution that limits their rights. When he denied, the people decided to storm a prison is Paris called the Bastille.This started the French Revolution. The commoners won in the end.
  • 20.1: Britain: Adam Smith

    20.1: Britain: Adam Smith
    Adam Smith was a a British writer who thought that economics economics should be controlled by natural laws.He believed that governments should not try to control the economy and that economic growth came when individuals were free to make their own choices. He published a book called The Wealth Of Nations.
  • 8.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Olympics

    8.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Olympics
    One of the ways the Greeks honored the gods was to hold an event every four years in Olympia. They use to do simple things like running, but now we have a lot more types of sports to do. The first modern Olympics event was held in Athens in 1896.
  • 4.4: Egypt: MODERN DAY EVENT: Paper and writing.

    4.4: Egypt: MODERN DAY EVENT: Paper and writing.
    The modern paper we use today we're inspired by Egypt's papyrus. They used it to write scrolls and hieroglyphics.
  • 3.4: Phoenicia: MODERN DAY EVENT: The early alphabet

    3.4: Phoenicia: MODERN DAY EVENT: The early alphabet
    Thanks to the Phoenicians, we can use the alphabets that I'm using now. These letters originated from the idea of recording their trading activities.
  • 5.2: India: MODERN DAY EVENT: Nonviolence

    5.2: India: MODERN DAY EVENT: Nonviolence
    The Jains (Jainism people) practiced nonviolence, the avoidance of violent actions. Last Sunday, a few people held up flags of peace to stop American wars in Napa. The signs would write things such as "NO JUSTICE-KNOW PEACE" and "NONVIOLENCE OR NON-EXISTENCE"
  • 6.4: China: MODERN DAY EVENT: the seismograph

    6.4: China: MODERN DAY EVENT: the seismograph
    During the Han Dynasty, a man called Zhang Heng invented the seismograph - the first way to record an earthquake. It had saved countless lives, and it's appearance has changed during the years. During the 6th of October, seismograph readings detected a dramatic increase in seismic activity at the Bali volcano in Indonesia.
  • 9.4: Greece: MODERN DAY EVENT: Geometry

    9.4: Greece: MODERN DAY EVENT: Geometry
    Euclid lived at around 300BC. He is now known as the Father Of Geometry. He has wrote about the relationship between mathematics and other fields, such as astronomy and music. Many rules in geometry were there because of Euclid.
  • 10.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Republic

    10.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Republic
    The government type called the Republic started in Rome. It was one of Rome’s greatest strengths. Because of this, other countries are also Republic countries such as: U.S.A, China, Russia, etc.
  • 11.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: Christianity

    11.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: Christianity
    Christianity is one of the most famous religions in the whole world. Christianity actually started as a denomination of Judaism, the original religion that talked about the Laws of Moses and the coming of the Messiah. The New Testament talks about the life of Jesus: his teaching's, his death and resurrection. It also talks about Paul of Tarsus' letters (epistles) to parts of the Roman Empire. Christianity has been spread across the world because of Jesus, God's anointed one: the Messiah.
  • 12.2: Mecca: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Five Pillars Of Islam

    12.2: Mecca: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Five Pillars Of Islam
    The Five Pillars Of Islam are five acts of worship required by Muslims. Each pillar has a different meaning that is listed here.
    1) Must state their faith by saying, “There is no God but God, and Muhammad is his prophet.”
    2) Muslims must pray 5 times a day
    3) Muslims donate 2.5% of their wealth to the poor and needy
    4) Muslims must fast for around a month
    5) Muslims must travel to Mecca at least once
  • 13.2: Ghana Empire: MODERN DAY EVENT: Online Shopping

    13.2: Ghana Empire: MODERN DAY EVENT: Online Shopping
    Silent bartering was a method the West Africans used while trading. They would leave their trade items near a river for the other merchants to come and take the stuff. They would do the same thing, but with the things they brought to trade. Online shopping is ALMOST the same thing. You would go online and buy something and it would be delivered to you. And you would give the pay back by using your credit card!
  • 14.2: China: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Grand Canal

    14.2: China: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Grand Canal
    The Grand Canal started in the Sui dynasty and finished building in the Tang dynasty. It linked North and South China and was a big deal when talking about trading in China. This Canal is still around and is still an important place in China. It’s even known to be a UNESCO World Herritage Site.
  • 15.2: Japan: MODERN DAY EVENT: Samurai

    15.2: Japan: MODERN DAY EVENT: Samurai
    The Samurai have been a massive topic to talk about relating to Japanese culture. Their history is very interesting and people still train in the way of the Samurai. Many people like to dress up like them and research them too. There’s even a Batman movie relating to ninjas and samurais now. The samurai have left an impact in Japan’s past and present.
  • 16.1: Maya Civilization: MODERN DAY EVENT: The 365 Calendar

    16.1: Maya Civilization: MODERN DAY EVENT: The 365 Calendar
    The Mayans were way ahead of their time, they were even attempting to predict the end of the world (but it didn’t happen). They built observatories for priests to plan the next religious festival, and to watch the stars. They used to knowledge from the observatories to make two calendars. One was a 260-day calendar to keep track of religious events. The other is the one we use today: The 365-day calendar. It was more accurate than the ones used in Europe back then.
  • 17.2: Europe: MODERN DAY EVENT: Universities

    17.2: Europe: MODERN DAY EVENT: Universities
    There is at least one university in a city (I think). Universities originated in the medieval times. Monks would study here and teach other uneducated peasants and serfs.
  • 18.4: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Magna Carta

    18.4: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Magna Carta
    The Magna Carta was a list rights the king couldn’t ignore. These rights saved the people from the terrible things kings had done. Now, these set of rights are also listed on the U.S. Constitution.
  • 19.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: Protestants

    19.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: Protestants
    Because of Martin Luther’s opinions, Protestants were made. These people then made their own churches with the Lutheran ideas or Huguenot ideas, or any other famous reformer’s ideas. These became the many different types of churches we see today.
  • 20.3: England: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Influence

    20.3: England: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Influence
    When England defeated the Spanish Armada, their power grew drastically. And with the new discoveries of Columbus about the Americas, the British traded with the colonies in America, and their wealth grew too. They became so powerful that they eventually made the British Empire, conquering (almost) the entire globe. We can see it’s influence today with the fact that we are speaking English, the British language.
  • 21.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: The United States Of America

    21.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: The United States Of America
    In 1776, Thomas Jefferson wrote the Decoration of Independence, the document that declared the independence of the British colonies in America. This document was signed by all the representative in the colonies, and a new country was born: the United States of America. This event has drastic effects on the modern day, for many important things that have revolutionized the world have come from USA.
  • Period:
    10,000 BCE
    to
    -500 BCE

    Chapter 3: Early Fertile Crescent People

    The groups that had lived in the Fertile Crescent are: Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Hittites, Kassites, Assyrians, Chaldeans, ant the Phoenicians
  • Period:
    3,200 BCE
    to
    400

    Chapter 4: Ancient Egypt & Kush

    Old Kingdom: 2700BC to 2200BC
    Middle Kingdom: 2050BC to 1750BC
    New Kingdom: 1550BC to 1050 BC
    Egytian rule over Kush: 1550BC to 1100BC
    Kushite rule over Egypt: 751BC to 670sBC
    End of Kush: 300sAD
  • Period:
    2,600 BCE
    to
    -500 BCE

    Chapter 8: Ancient Greece

    Mycenaeans: 1600-1100BC
    Minoans: 2600-1100BC
    Dark Ages: 1100-800BC
    Oligarchy rule: 600-546BC
    Tyranny rule: 546-500BC
    Democracy rule: 500-???
  • Period:
    2,300 BCE
    to
    500

    Chapter 5: Ancient India

    Harrapan civilization: 2300BC to 1700BC
    Aryan society: 1500BC to 320BC
    Founding of Buddhism: 528BC
    Mauryan Empire: 320BC to 185BC
    Gupta Empire: 320AD to 500AD
  • Period:
    1,600 BCE
    to
    220

    Chapter 6: Ancient China

    Xia Dynasty: 2200BC to ???
    Shang Dynasty: 1500BC to 1050BC
    Zhou Dyanasty: 1100BC to 400BC (longest dynasty)
    Qin Dynasty: 221BC-206BC
    Han Dynasty: 206BC-220AD
  • Period:
    -753 BCE
    to
    -23 BCE

    Chapter 10: The Roman Republic

    Founding of Rome (According to legend): 753BC
    Etruscans take over Rome: 600BC
    Roman Republic: 509BC
    Punic Wars: 246-146BC
  • Period:
    -550 BCE
    to
    30

    Chapter 9: The Greek World

    Persian Empire (From Cyrus to Alexander: 550BC-330BC
    The Persian Wars: 490BC-449BC
    Peloponnesian War: 431BC-404BC
    Alexander The Great's life: 356BC-323BC
  • Period:
    -500 BCE
    to

    Chapter 13: Early African Civilizations

    Ghana Empire: 800AD-1200AD
    Mali: 1200AD-1500AD
    Songhai: 1300AD-1600AD
    Askia the Great: 1443AD-1538AD
  • Period:
    -500 BCE
    to
    1537

    Chaper 16: The Early Ameriacas

    Mayans: 200-1500
    Aztecs: 1325-1521
    Incas: 1400-1537
  • Period:
    -50 BCE
    to
    1453

    Chapter 11: Rome and Christianity

    Caesar’s rule: 45 BC to 50 BC
    Beginning of Empire: 27 BC
    Life of Jesus: 1 AD to 30 AD
    Christianity becomes sole religion: 300s AD
    Split of Roman Empire: 395 AD
    End of Western Roman Empire: 476 AD
    Fall of Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantine Empire): 1453 AD
  • Period:
    400
    to
    1200

    Chapter 17: The Early Middle Ages

    Middle Ages: Around 500 to 1500
    Charlemagne: 742-814
    Eleanor Of Aquitaine: 1122-1204
    Start of Feudalism: 1000s
  • Period:
    550
    to

    Chapter 12: The Islamic World

    Muhammad: 570-632
    Ottoman Empire: 1299-present day
    Safavid Empire: 1501-1700s
    Mughal Empire:1500s-1600s
  • Period:
    550
    to

    Chapter 15: Japan

    Prince Shotoku: 573-621
    The Tale Of Genji: 1000
    Kublai Khan invasions: 1274, 1281
    Samurai Period: c. 1200-1800
    First Shogun: 1192
  • Period:
    589
    to

    Chapter 14: China

    Sui Dynasty: 589-618
    Tang Dynasty: 618-918
    Song Dyansty: 960-1279
    Yuan Dynasty: 1279-1368
    Ming Dynasty: 1368-1644
    Empress Wu: 627-705
    Kublai Khan: 1215-1294
  • Period:
    1000
    to
    1500

    Chapter 18: The Later Middle Ages

    Crusades: 1096AD-1291AD
    Saladin: 1137AD-1193AD
    King Richard I: 1157AD-1199AD
    Francis Of Assisi: 1182AD-1226AD
    Saint Thomas Aquinas: 1225AD-1274AD
    Magna Carta: 1215AD
    Queen Isabella: 1451AD-1504AD
  • Period:
    1270
    to

    Chapter 19: The Renaissance and Reformation

    Michelangelo: 1475-1564
    Leonardo Da Vinci: 1452-1519
    Johann Gutenberg: mid-1400s
    William Shakespeare: 1564-1616
    Martin Luther: 1483-1546
    Thirty Years’ War: 1618-1648
  • Period:
    1400
    to

    Chapter 20: Science and Exploration

    Nicholaus Copernicus: 1473-1543
    Galileo Galilei: 1564-1642
    Isaac Newton: 1642-1727 Sailing Explorations
    Dias: 1487-1488
    Vasco da Gama: 1497-1498
    Cabral: 1500-1501
    Christopher Columbus: 1492-1493
    Ferdinand Magellan: 1519-1522
    Cartier: 1534-1535
    Francis Drake: 1577-1580
    Cabot: 1497-1498
  • Period: to

    Chapter 21: Enlightenment and Revolution

    Voltaire: 1694-1778
    John Locke: 1632-1704
    Charles Louis Montesquieu: 1689-1704
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau: 1712-1778
    English Bill Of Rights: 1689
    United States Decloration of Independence: 1776
    French Decloration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen: 1789